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Rent Control Cities

Municipality

Restriction

Ordinance

Alameda

Landlords are limited to the base rent charged as of 9/1/19 plus the Annual General Adjustment (AGA). For tenancies beginning after 9/1/19, the base rent is the initial rent amount. The AGA is calculated using 70% of the regional Consumer Price Index (CPI), with a 1% floor and 5% ceiling. Each year in May the Program Administrator announces the AGA effective September 1st. A Landlord who does not increase rent by the full amount allowed annually can "bank" the unused portion and impose it in a later year.  A new AGA of 3.5% went into effect on September 1, 2022. However, special Pandemic "wind-down" rules apply. See the Alameda Rent Program FAQ.

Alameda, California Code of Ordinances §§ 6-58.10 - 6-58.155



Antioch

Effective 7/23/22 landlords may increase rent once every 12 months, limited to 60 percent of the local CPI or 3%, whichever is less. Single-family homes without accessory units, condominiums and cooperatives are exempt as are units first certified for occupancy after 2/1/95.

 Antioch Municipal Code Title 11, Chapter 1. §§ 11-1.01 - 11-1.013. Rent Stabilization.

Baldwin Park

Rent is effectively limited to 5% per 12-month period (based on the Consumer Price Index) of the "base rent ceiling" (rent in effect on 3/5/19, or if none the initial rent charged on the first day of tenancy).

Baldwin Park Code of OrdinancesChapter 11§§ 129.01 - 129.78

Bell Gardens

Rent increases are limited to 50% of the local CPI or 4%, whichever ls less.

Bell Gardens Municipal Code

Chapter 5.62, "Rent Stabilization", and Chapter 5.63,"Tenant Eviction Protections".

Berkeley

Each January 1st rent ceilings are increased by the Annual General Adjustment (AGA). The AGA is set by October 31 of the preceding year, but has been 65% of the percentage increase of the regional Consumer Price Index (CPI) since 2005. Landlords or tenants may petition for exception.

Berkeley Municipal Code §§ 13.76.110 - 13.76.120

Beverly Hills

Landlord may increase rent once every 12 months, limited to 3% of the current rent, or the regional Consumer Price Index (CPI), whichever is higher.

Beverly Hills Municipal Code § 4-6-3

City of Commerce

Rent increases are expressly subject to the provisions of AB 1482 California Tenant Protections Act (Cal. Civ. Code §§ 1946.2 and 1947.12).

City of Commerce Municipal Code §§ 19.40.010 - 19.40.090

Cudahy

Landlord may increase rent once every 12 months, limited to 3% of the current rent or the change in the regional Consumer Price Index (CPI), whichever is lower. The base rent is the rent charged for a unit in effect on April 11, 2022.

Cudahy Municipal Code Chapter 5.13. Rent Stabilization. §§5.13.101 - 5.13.170

Culver City

The rent as of 10/30/20 on then-existing tenancies, or the initial rent charged on tenancies beginning thereafter, is the "base rate" from which increases are calculated. Increases are limited per 12-month period to the average annual change in the Consumer Price Index (CPI) with a cap of 5%; if the CPA increase is less than 2%, the cap is 2%. Landlords can petition for an increase above the cap amount. (CCMC § 15.09.215).

Culver City Municipal Code §§ 15.09.200 - 15.09.270


East Palo Alto

Annual rent increases are limited to 80% of the percentage increase in the regional Consumer Price Index (CPI). Overall increase may not exceed 10% in any 12-month period.

East Palo Alto, California Code of Ordinances §§ 14.04.040, 14.04.090 - 100

Fairfax

Effective October 6, 2023, rent increases are limited to 75% of the percentage increase in the regional consumer price index (CPI) annually. Overall increase may not exceed 5% total. The cap is retroactive to 2/2/22.

Fairfax Town Code

Title 5, Business.

Chapter 5.55 "Rent Stabilization Program" §§ 5.55.010-5.55.120.


"Floating home marinas"

"Floating home marinas" with five or more floating home berths cannot increase rent by more than 3% plus inflation up to a maximum of 5% per year.

CA Civ. Code § 800.4 et sec.

Gardena

Rent increases exceeding 5% are subject to mediation and binding arbitration.

Gardena Municipal Code §§ 14.04.010 - 14.04.300

Glendale

No limit on rent increases, but increases exceeding 7% over any 12 month period may trigger relocation payments if tenants choose to vacate rather than renew.

Glendale Municipal Code §§ 9.30.10 - 9.30.100

Hayward

Rent increases are limited to 5% per year absent exception. Landlords may "bank" annual increases, but aggregate rent increases cannot exceed 10% in any year.

Hayward Municipal Code

§§ 12:1.01 - 12:1.21

Inglewood

The base rent amount for calculations is the rent in effect on 6/18/19 or the initial rent for tenancies starting thereafter. Only one increase is allowed every 12 months, calculated from the day the increase first takes effect.


For residential properties with five or more units, the maximum increase is 3% or the cost of inflation (whichever is greater), as measured by the local CPI. The increase cannot exceed 10%.


For residential properties with four or less units, the maximum increase is 5% PLUS the cost of inflation as measured by the local CPI. The increase cannot exceed 10%.

Inglewood Municipal Code §§ 8-125 - 8-234

Larkspur

Only one rent increase is allowed every 12 months which cannot exceed 5% plus the regional Consumer Price Index (CPI), or 7% -whichever is lower. Base rent is the rent in effect on May 8, 2023.

City of Larkspur Municipal Code, Chapter 6.20. Rent Stabilization Ordinance. §§6.20.030 -6.20.110

Los Angeles

Only one rent increase is allowed every 12 months based upon the regional Consumer Price Index (CPI). Effective July 1, 2020, the annual allowable increase is 3%.

Los Angeles Municipal Code §§ 151.00 - 155.09

Unincorporated Los Angeles County

Only one rent increase is allowed annually, based on the change in the regional Consumer Price Index (CPI) up to a total of 8% including pass-throughs and fees.

Los Angeles County Code §§ 8.52.010 -8.52.200

Los Gatos

Rent may be increased only once annually and the increase cannot exceed the greater of 5% of existing rent, or 70% of the regional Consumer Price Index (CPI). The landlord can always increase rent with tenant's written consent.

Los Gatos Town Code §§ 14.80.010 - 14.80.315

Mountain View

Rents may be raised starting September 1st each year by board-determined amount that is no less than 2%, nor more than 5%, of the existing rent. Landlords may "bank" annual rent increases.

Mountain View Code of Ordinances §§ 1700 - 1720

Oakland

Rent may be increased once in any twelve month period. Increases are limited based upon the local Consumer Price Index (CPI) or to prior "banked" increases, but cannot exceed 60% of the percentage increase in the CPI for April of that calendar year from April of the immediately preceding calendar year, or 3%, whichever is lower. From 8/1/22 through 7/31/23 the limit is 3%. However, landlords may increase rent up to 5% for each qualifying additional tenant. Owners may also increase the rent when a tenant doesn't use the unit as a principal residence. Subtenants are also protected from overcharging by primary tenants. 

Oakland Municipal Code § 8.22.065 et seq.

Oxnard

Rent increases are limited to 4% annually, and one increase in any twelve (12) month period.

Oxnard City Code §§ 27-21 – 27-23

Palm Springs

Only one rent increase is allowed annually, limited to 75% of the increase in the regional Consumer Price Index (CPI). Rent control is permanently removed after the tenant voluntarily vacates or is evicted for cause. As a result, few properties remain subject to rent control.

Palm Springs Municipal Code §§ 4.02.010 - 4.08.190

Pasadena

Only one rent increase is allowed annually, limited to 75% of the increase in the regional Consumer Price Index (CPI).

Pasadena Municipal Code §§ 1801-1824

Richmond

Only one increase is allowed annually, limited to the lower of either 60% of the increase in the regional Consumer Price Index (CPI), or 3% of current rent, whichever is lower.

Richmond Code of Ordinances §§ 11.100.010 - 11.100.130


Sacramento

Rent increases cannot exceed 5% plus the percentage of annual increase in the cost of living adjustment promulgated by the U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. The total increase is capped at 10% annually, and only one increase is allowed in any 12 month period.

Sacramento City Code

§§ 5.156.010 - 5.156.150

San Francisco

Annual rent increases are limited to 60% of the regional Consumer Price Index (CPI).

San Francisco Administrative Code § 37.3

San Jose

The "Annual General Increase" is limited to the monthly rent for the previous 12 months, multiplied by 5% via one annual increase. The Landlord must petition for a higher increase.

San Jose Municipal Code §17.23.310

Santa Ana

For units built on or before 1/1/95, annual rent increases are limited to 3% per year, or 80% of the change in the Consumer Price Index over the most recent 12 month period-whichever is lower. The allowable increase is published no later than June 30 of each year.

Santa Ana Municipal Code §§ 8- 1998.1 – 8- 1998.3.

Santa Barbara

Rent increase are expressly subject to the provisions of AB 1482 California Tenant Protections Act (Cal. Civ. Code §§ 1946.2 and 1947.12).

Santa Barbara Municipal Code §§ 26.50.010 - 26.50.070

Santa Monica

The Rent Control Board determines each year's increase ("General Adjustment" or "GA") based on 75% of the Consumer Price Index ("CPI"). The Maximum Allowable Rent ("MAR") for any unit is its base rent plus the increase allowed per the annual GA.


In November 2022 voters approved Measure RC, which implemented a "rollback" on the 2022 GA, caps future GAs at 3% total beginning February 2023, and reduced the MAR to .8% through August 2023 - effectively bringing the 2023 average rent increase to 3%.


Based on that 3%, the 2023 MAR is 2.8% starting September 1, 2023. The Board also set a maximum $67.00 increase limit on units paying in excess of $2375.


Confused? The city has a helpful webpage for determining allowable increases here.

Santa Monica City Charter Amendment §§ 1800 - 1821

Thousand Oaks

Rent control is very limited–it only applies to tenants who have resided in the same unit since 1987.

Thousand Oaks Rent Stabilization Ordinances Nos. 755-NS, 956-NS, 1284-NS

West Hollywood

Rent increases are limited to 75% of the increase in the regional Consumer Price Index (CPI) during the preceding 12 months.

West Hollywood Municipal Code §§ 17.36.020 et seq.


 Evictions in rent control cities


In rent control cities, landlords may face certain restrictions and regulations when it comes to evicting tenants. The purpose of these regulations is to protect tenants from unfairly losing their homes. It's important for landlords to understand the specific eviction rules in their jurisdiction before taking any actions. Here are some key points to consider:


1. Just Cause Evictions: Rent control cities typically require landlords to have a valid reason, or "just cause," for evicting a tenant. Common just causes may include nonpayment of rent, lease violations, property damage, or the landlord's intention to occupy the unit.


2. Eviction Notice: Landlords must provide tenants with a written notice stating the reason for eviction and allowing them a certain period of time to respond or rectify the issue. The notice period required can vary depending on local laws.


3. Relocation Assistance: In some rent control cities, landlords may be required to provide relocation assistance to tenants who are being evicted due to reasons beyond their control, such as substantial renovations or a change in property use.


4. Rent Board or Housing Department: Rent control cities often have a rent board or housing department that landlords can contact to learn about their specific rights and responsibilities. These agencies can provide further guidance on the eviction process and any applicable local ordinances.


5. Legal Advice: It is highly recommended for landlords in rent control cities to consult with a qualified attorney who specializes in landlord-tenant law. They can provide guidance on navigating the eviction process within the specific jurisdiction.


Where to get more information about rent control


To obtain more information about rent control specifically for landlords, you can consider the following sources:


1. Local Government Websites: Check the website of your city or municipality's housing department or rent control board. They often provide resources, guidelines, and regulations specifically aimed at landlords operating within rent control areas.


2. Landlord Associations or Organizations: Look for landlord associations or organizations in your area that specialize in rental property management or landlord advocacy. They often provide resources, guidance, and workshops pertaining to rent control regulations and best practices for landlords.


3. Legal Resources: Consult with a real estate attorney who is knowledgeable about local rent control laws. They can provide you with a comprehensive understanding of your rights and obligations as a landlord under rent control regulations.


4. Community Workshops or Seminars: Keep an eye out for local workshops or seminars organized by housing agencies, community organizations, or tenant advocacy groups. These events may offer information specifically tailored to landlords operating in rent control areas.



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